Cialis

You’ve probably seen Cialis commercials. Too many of them, if you’re anything like your humble host, and it doesn’t take much watching to get to that point.

But what the heck is it? Does it work? And if it does, is there an equivalent substance for women?

Cialis is the marketing name for tadalafil, a PDE5 inhibitor like Viagara (sildenafil). Like sildenafil, it was originally developed to control blood pressure issues, and was found to have very… well, entertaining side effects. Tadalafil is also marketed as Adcirca for use against pulmonary arterial hypertension, through the simple (and common) expedient of declaring a different (side-)effect as the primary effect.

Note: the effects of tadalafil last for 3 to 4 times as long as sildenafil!

Its famed use to combat erectile dysfunction comes from inhibiting the PDE5 enzyme, and I have no intention of diving into that maze of chemicals. In short, it helps blood flow to the penis (once the erectile reaction is triggered) but not away from it. Once properly taut, sensitivity is at maximum.

Yes. It works, for a fair while, and with minimal side effects – though of course every drug, down to caffeine, needs to be treated carefully.

There is another compound called “Ladialis,” being a clunky portmanteau of “Lady Cialis,” which is available as well. Does it work, too? How?

It does indeed. Under its influence, the same sort of increased blood flow causes the clitoris to become very sensitive, and other effects such as lubrication reportedly follow on with reliability.

The secret ingredient, the chemical that allows for this is: tadalafil. Yep. The exact same stuff. The pink or yellow coloring you usually see in “Cialis for women” ads is nothing more than marketing. PDE5 inhibitors have, if not exactly the same effect on women as men, then effects perfectly analogous.

Tadalafil, as a PDE5 inhibitor, has advantages over other sorts of drugs: vasectomy, menopause, and hysterectomy don’t interfere with its actions; it can negate the sexual side effects of anti-depressants (though always check before mixing such things); and it is a great help to those naturally less sensitive or who have sensitivity damaged by things like smoking. Those who are extremely sensitive normally, however, may find it to be a sensory overload, which is less fun than it may sound.

Stranger, here you will do well to tarry; here our highest good is pleasure.