Gotu Kola

Also called fo-ti-tieng or Solomon’s seal, and botanically listed as Hydrocotyle asiatica, gotu kola has been in medical literature for about 2000 years. It is used to promote relaxation and improve memory, and to ward off fever and cold symptoms.

Gotu Kola
Gotu Kola

Chinese and Indian medicine also uses it to fight skin inflammation and as a mild diuretic. It seems to improve the flow of blood throughout the body by strengthening the veins and capillaries, and has been used successfully to treat phlebitis (inflammation of the veins) and leg cramps, among other related ills. It appears to aid the body in fighting off degenerative diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis. It has also been proven to help new mothers recover from episiotomy and childbirth in general. The Chinese name means “elixir for long life.”

Very nice, you say, but what does this have to do with aphrodisiacs? Although it contains no caffeine (and has no close relation to the kola nut), gotu kola is a mild relaxant, and does seem to help with vascular strength. Together, and over time, it can help get past a variety of causes of lack of libido, and apparently is especially valuable to women in this regard. As an aphrodisiac it is slow, indirect, and more about fixing negatives than adding positives… but any help is help, I suppose.

Join the conversation (new commenters may not appear immediately)

Stranger, here you will do well to tarry; here our highest good is pleasure.