A Cocktail You Can’t Refuse

Perhaps you can; your humble host finds one of its variations hard to resist.

According to Disaronno, Marlon Brando’s favorite cocktail in the early 1970s, when he filmed The Godfather, was a mix of Scotch and amaretto. Naturally enough, that became the drink’s name. It’s an odd enough combination, especially considering the purist views of most Scotch drinkers, that it might not have been around before that.

Though the IBA calls for equal amounts of each ingredient, Disaronno recommends leaning more heavily on the whisky, and I am inclined to agree. In fact, if the Scotch is very mild, I sometimes cut back on the amaretto still further, to the 4:1 ratio a lot of people recommend these days. For the Scotch, you want something full-flavored but with little to no smoke, such as Speyside or Highland.

Stir or strain over some sizable rocks. Must be very cold.

Godfather
· old-fashioned, ice
1¼ Scotch whisky (pref. Speyside or Highland)
¾ amaretto

Simple, pleasant, sweet. But eventually someone noticed that it was a bit lopsided in flavor and came up with a variation that gets mixed in the Villa fairly often, the Godson.

Godson
· old-fashioned, ice
1½ Scotch whisky (pref. Speyside or Highland)
¾ amaretto
¾ cream

Heavy cream is definitely best for this, and gives a wonderful, luxurious feel to the thing. Sometimes you’ll see it finished with a grind of nutmeg. But not often. In any case, it is one of my all-time favorites.

By now you know that people can never leave well enough alone when it comes to mixing things, and the Godfather’s engendered a whole family. Basically, it’s just switching out the main alcohol.

Godmother
· old-fashioned, ice
1¼ vodka
¾ amaretto

French Connection
· old-fashioned, ice
1¼ cognac
¾ amaretto

Goddaughter
· old-fashioned, ice
1½ vodka
¾ amaretto
¾ cream

And then there’s the version that uses bourbon instead of Scotch, but I’m unaware of any particular name for it. The Kentuckyfather? The Bastard? The Corn Connection? I don’t know.

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